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PORTFOLIO
HE-SHE
   - FEMME FATALE

THE LADIES ROOM
   - MAITRESSE
   - THE BABE DEN
   - 100% PURE HEROINE
   - STRONG & SEXY
   - CHANGED LANDSCAPES

THE PERSONAL IS POLITICAL

LIGHT DRAWINGS

WHITE LACE

DIVINE LIGHT
   - Jewish Women of the Bible
   - The Tefillin Project
   - Two Generations X Seven
       Emotions
   - HOME
   - Shabbat Prayers
   - songs of the land
   - Garments-of-Light
   - embodied light
    - divine dahlias
   - DANCE TO THE MUSIC
   - wrestling with leviticus 18:22
   - Hallelujah

BET HAYYIM

URBAN ARCHEOLOGY & MODERN RUINS

THE WORLD OF DOLLS


EXHIBITIONS

Early Works

The Center for Fine Art Photography, Ft Collins, CO. Feb - March 2014
RayKo Photo Center, San Francisco CA
Oct - Nov 2013
Newspace Center for Photography, Portland, WA
April 2013
www.earlyworksproject.org/exhibition28.html
www.earlyworksproject.org/exhibition.html

Early Works is an exhibition that examines the naive imagery made by contemporary photographers when they were children. These early images often reveal surprising talent, visual intuition, and honesty. Kept for many decades in shoeboxes and faded albums, the images are often cherished belongings that play a key role in defining the self as artist. This exhibition will be a close look at photographers’ earliest works, paired with personal narratives about the images and their role in each photographers’ development as an artist.


NEWS

Jersey City Independent
July 15 2013

Local Photographer Remembers Fight for Gender Equality, Demonstration on Liberty Island

By Matt Hunger

Babe Den
 
 

Early Works link dot      
Daw Aung Suu Kyi link dot link dot link dot link dot
Counter Culture Media link dot link dot link dot link dot link dot
Women Unite link dot link dot link dot link dot link dot

THE PERSONAL IS POLITICAL

My portfolio, ‘The Personal is Political’ depicts female activists who speak out about freedom and human rights.

I took the picture, ‘Syd and Jackie’ in 1961, during my summer at Cejwin Camps in Port Jervis, NY. It has been on exhibit in ‘EARLY WORKS,’ a travelling show and online website that contains photographs taken by many notable photographers when they were children; each paired with a personal narrative recalling the memory of the experience and how it affected them. The image of ‘Syd and Jackie’ reminded me why gender identity became the subject of my fine art photography and human rights the focus of my photojournalism.

I lived in Iowa City during 1969 and joined a women’s collective that was publishing an ‘underground’ newspaper, ‘Ain’t I a Woman,’ (the name based on a speech given by Sojourner Truth, an emancipated slave, in 1851 at the Women’s Convention in Akron Ohio.) At that time, it was one of five counter-culture newspapers published by women across the US.

The ‘Ain’t I a Woman’ collective published some of the most articulate and radical papers about race, class and gender including ‘The Women Identified Woman.’ Our redefinition of women’s roles took on political meaning when it challenged the distribution of power in society.

It was International Women’s Day in 1970 and on Ellis Island, a group of women with clandestinely rolled up banners boldly climbed the stairs inside the Statue of Liberty and hung both the women’s symbol and the words proclaiming ‘Women of the World Unite’ from the windows on top of the statue. Another group of women marched below with signs declaring “Equal Rights for Women NOW!” as they demonstrated for equal rights in the workplace.

Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, one of the world’s most prominent political prisoners, spent 15 out of 22 years locked under house arrest. During that time she received the 1991 Nobel Peace Prize for her commitment to nonviolent change in Burma. When I met her in 1996 she had temporarily been released and despite constant intimidation and threats was publically addressing the fears of the Burmese citizens who dared to come to her house.

“I like to think that perhaps we are now at our darkest hours,” Daw Suu told me, “but it is always darkest before dawn. By intimidation the authorities have tried to keep people from taking any interest in politics but you cannot stay away from politics because politics will not stay away from you. It will follow you everywhere.”

Aung San Suu Kyi was released in 2010, and in 2012 was elected to the National Assembly. Despite her imprisonment, Daw Suu spoke out about freedom and human rights, and would not let a dictatorship silence her voice.


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